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A Career in Library, Education, and Training Fields

Contrary to popular opinion, a career in library science of training is not, as it was considered, the province of those older females who have no prospects, of the lonely bookish man. These are for nearly anyone who enjoys reading, helping others to learn and grow and who likes the challenge of meeting new people and new situations on an hourly basis.

Library science and education is a challenging field with a great deal to learn to provide for a career there. In the United States, the American Library Association and the Organization for the Advancement of Library Employees advocates the improvement of salaries and conditions for nearly all library workers. This means that at times they are not paid what their education and work efforts are worth strictly speaking.

The average salary for a librarian in 2006 was about $51,000 with salary ranges from $22,000 to $250,000 at the upper level. Educational requirements for librarians are about the same as for a teacher or instructor with some minimal differences dependent upon which area of library science or which type of librarian you wish to become.

For a Teacher-Librarian the mandatory requirements for an entry level position in this field will be:

1. That you obtain a bachelors degree from any accredited institution of higher learning

2. Hold a masters degree in library science, educational media or school library media

3. Have a provisional or professional teaching license

4. Have completed a one year teaching experience or internship in the classroom

5. Pass the library content area test.

To become a school librarian the recommended educational values are different, somewhat less stringent than for those of a Teacher Librarian. These will include:

1. Get your bachelors degree from a university or college.

2. Hold a provisional teaching license of a professional teaching license

3. May or may not have classroom teaching experience

For the School Librarian licensure there are some other methods to achieve this which may be helpful for those who are not in a position to accomplish the first set of criterion.
Those methods will include:

A. Complete all the requirements necessary to get your provisional or professional teaching license through an approved ATPP (Alternative Teaching Preparation Program) or a Teacher in Residence program

B. Complete thirty hours or more of graduate level library science programs.

C. Complete 24 or more hours of graduate level library science programs for an added endorsement

D. Pass the library content test

The Bureau of Labor and Statistics offers a set of trends and statistics for the position of Librarian and publishes a Library workers fact sheet which is available for your perusal at Department of Labor.

http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos068.htm

The typical concepts of the librarian have changed drastically in recent years and as such new opportunities have arisen in many areas that were not thought to be the province of a librarian per se. Librarians are now needed to work in places that house some of the more advanced types of media such as micro film, CD-ROM and remote access libraries. As a consequence, the position of librarian is far more technically oriented than it has been at any time in history.

Librarians have the task of assisting people to find many kinds of information that is used for anything from professional to personal to employment related and must often do so when the given information is minimal in nature. They also manage staff, accounts and the aspects of the library that require their input. Library science today meets several types of work load that include management, technical and administrative and as such are required to know more or learn more daily.

Some companies do not pay their librarians according to these factors but instead pay them according to a national scale of what is the norm in their area, taking into account in some cases additional educational expertise. As a general rule, the larger the area or library, the higher the pay scale will be.

Libraries which pay a fair or above average wage to their workers include: The United States Federal Government, at about $75,000 per year. Canadian government. at about $20.00 per hour. Salaries will vary according to individual qualifications aside from type and location of the library.

Colleges and universities will pay approximately $50,00 per year, while elementary and secondary schools in the United States will pay about $48,000. Local governments and municipalities will pay about $42,000 per annum. (Facts gleaned from US Dept of Labor)

Career Education and Planning Your Future

You may or may not have had a career education course in your grade school, high school or even college years. This can be a great tool to help individuals discover the available career choices to them. But, even as a young or middle-aged adult you may have questions about your career path and you may want additional career education. You may be unhappy in your chosen profession, or you may want to update your knowledge and skills but you are not sure how.

The internet is one of the most beneficial tools available to people who need career education. You can find personality, skill, and knowledge assessments; there are online courses designed to give you continuing education, and even universities which offer very type of degree from an associate’s to a doctorate. Once you have gotten the career education, training and skills you need, you can even find a new job online.

Assessments can help you to narrow down your career choices. Many career education courses provide them for students. Online you will find assessments such as the Myers-Briggs Personality profile, conflict resolution style, negotiation style, and so on and so on. Once you have found out what your strengths and weaknesses are, you will be better able to choose a career. Some government agencies even offer career education and job counseling for individuals who are looking for a career.

It may be a helpful step to you, as you embark on your career education path, to set up a plan. You should think about your skills, your values, your interests, and your personality. Decide on a career and then outline exactly what you will need to do to get there. Update and change your plan as necessary-then comes the real career education.

You will be amazed at the number of online universities and training programs available. Some are offered as an extension of traditional universities as a distance learning program. Whether you are looking for a degree program or just a recertification or training program, you will need to make sure that the university or organization offering the courses or program is accredited or recognized by those in your field of choice. You can usually take the courses at your own speed. You can often find financing, grants and scholarships, to assist you if you need it. As you take classes, evaluate yourself from time to time to make sure that this is still your career of choice.

Now you are ready to look for a job. There are online classifieds and job search services for nearly every profession. Many are free and allow you to personalize your search as needed.

So, go online, and get to work.

Child Development Media Videos And Training Materials

Child Development Media, Inc.

Margie Wagner, M. Ed., is the founder and driving force behind Child Development Media, Inc (CDMI). She has worked with special needs children for thirty years and her passion for working with such children is evident in her commitment to providing superior training and supervision materials. In 1993, she developed CDMI, the world’s largest single source of commercially available books, videos, and curricula on child development. CDMI’s website is a rich resource for educators and professionals, offering resources tailored to all age groups and selected by experts.

Site Resources

Although the site has many, many resources, it is designed for easy navigation. Choose from broad categories of books, videos, curricula, and conferences to get an overview of the top selling and highly recommended videos, such as “Observing Young Children: Learning to Look, Looking to Learn,” book titles such as Play in Practice, or curriculum guides such as “Respecting How Children Learn Through Play.” Find child development conference, seminar, and workshop information on the home page and under the “Conferences” tab. Concise summaries of the materials help practitioners select the resources they can best use.

The Assessment and Planning section of the website contains numerous titles designed to help practitioners better understand the process of assessing and appropriately planning for the education of children. From ages and stages questionnaires to videos explaining the individualized education plan to resources about the autistic child, the titles available here will provide invaluable resources for educators and administrators.

CDMI’s Curricula section is rich in educator resources, from self-directed teacher’s guides to handouts to videos that detail science, math, and visual arts in the classroom. Divided into infant/toddler, preschool, and parent education and guidance sections, the resources are logically categorized for easy navigation, leaving room for “browsing” as well.

The site’s History, Theory and Research section contains works by Erikson, Piaget, Bowlby, and Dewey and others. Rich in both biographical information as well as theory and research, the books and videos here provide excellent sources for a solid groundwork in child development theory.

Infant massage, raising non-violent children, stimulating sensory and motor development, adoption issues, parent involvement in education, and discipline are but some of the varied topics available in the Parenting section of CDMI’s site. Books and videos geared toward an audience of parents from a variety of educational levels provide practitioners a selection of ways to present important parenting information.

The site’s Play section covers playground safety, Piagetian theory of cognitive development, research on the benefits of play, and design principals for children’s play areas. A wide variety of topics are covered here, but they all center on the promotion of play as an important aspect of childhood development.

Child hearing loss, language development, second language learning, sign language, and speech language delay are the topics covered in CDMI’s Language and Communication section. Here you will find resources for parents and educators designed to promote language and communication skills, to use everyday communication to foster these skills, and a basic primer on sign language, among other titles.

Comprehensive Site with Many Titles

The CDMI site contains many, many more titles; the catalogue, available online and in print, is 200 pages long. Browsing this well organized site will result in finding source material you never knew existed, and choosing what titles to order will be hard.

The company offers a thirty day money-back guarantee and secure ordering and encourages site users to contact them with any questions or new materials. While you’re on the site, visit the CDMI blog for summaries of recent studies regarding child development. Plan on spending a lot of time on your first visit to this page; there is a lot to see!