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Medical Assisting Career Preparation and Training Possibilities

Enrollment in an accredited school, college, or degree program will help you to receive the educational training that you need to obtain a career in medical assisting. By completing an accredited training program in this field you will be ready to seek the employment you desire and deserve. Opportunities exist at various levels to allow you to gain the skills and knowledge that fit your needs and goals. You can work with different medical professionals in a number of settings carrying out different tasks related to the career path you choose. Start by learning more about program options and enroll today.

Medical assisting careers are available once you have earned an accredited certificate or associate degree. This can be done through enrolling in an accredited school or college. You will be required to dedicate anywhere from several months to two years on learning. By completing an associate degree or certificate program you will have the skills that are needed to enter into employment. Continuing education is also available if you wish to add to the skills and knowledge you have or pursue another medical related career.

Professionals in this field are trained to carry out a number of tasks. You can learn to work with patients and other medical professionals to:

  • Schedule Appointments
  • Draw Blood
  • Administer Medications
  • Take Vital Signs
  • Maintain Records

…and much more. Once you have received an education in medical assisting you will be able to work in various places performing these job duties.

There are different employment possibilities available to you depending on the level of education that you have chosen to receive. You can look forward to working as a medical assistant in various places such as:

  • Hospitals
  • Clinics
  • Private Practices
  • Outpatient Care Centers

…and other medical related facilities. When looking to prepare for a career in this field it is important that you complete all courses and training that is required in order to seek employment in these areas.

Coursework typically covers all areas of the field that you are obtaining an education in as well as specialized studies. By enrolling in an accredited school or college you can expect to learn various topics that relate to the profession you choose. Course topics will vary but can help you to learn accounting, anatomy, keyboarding, medical terminology, medical law, laboratory techniques, and much more. Pursuing an education in this field will teach you to become a medical professional by providing you with the certificate or degree training you need to enter the workforce and begin employment.

Accredited medical assisting colleges are designed to provide the proper educational training that is necessary for you to enter a successful career. You can ensure that you will obtain the best possible education by enrolling in a program that carries full accreditation. Agencies like the ACICS ( http://www.acics.org/ ) are approved to accredit schools and colleges that meet all criteria. You can start training for the career you dream of by finding a program and enrolling today.

DISCLAIMER: Above is a GENERIC OUTLINE and may or may not depict precise methods, courses and/or focuses related to ANY ONE specific school(s) that may or may not be advertised on our website.

Copyright 2010 – All rights reserved by PETAP, LLC.

Distance Education and E-Learning – Past, Present and Future

Buzzwords in education have been in existence since the on-set of formal education as we know it today. Many of these terms come and go based on their usage and their context but some terminologies have withstood the test of time. Let us take a look at some of the common terms along with the chronology of how they evolved.

Although often used interchangeably, there is distinction between distance education and distance learning. Distance education takes place using print-based and electronic learning resources. Learners are connected to resources, instructors, and to other learners, and they tend to be separated by time and/or geographic/physical distance. Distance learning on the other hand is the actual system and the process, which connects a group of learners with the distributed learning resources. Learning takes place in various different forms but in general learners, instructors, and the necessary resources are separated by time and space.

Distance learning has over the years transitioned to online distance learning. It tends to utilize synchronous and asynchronous tools, and learning and communication methods. Synchronous learning uses electronically delivered teaching and learning with participants simultaneously and directly connected and communicating. On the other hand asynchronous learning is characterized by a time lag in communication.

A while back, along came e-learning! Electronic learning (e-learning) is defined as the delivery of instructional content using electronic means such as the Internet, intranets, audio and video equipment, web conferencing, virtual classrooms, CD-ROM, and more recently Web 2.0 tools. Simply put, e-learning is another mode of technology-aided teaching and learning. In the last few years, it has come to replace terms such as audio-visual learning, computer-based learning, web-based learning, online learning, and other buzz terms of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s.

E-learning is moving toward total automation of teaching and learning processes using software known as Learning Management Systems (LMS). To facilitate the development of courses that utilize Internet-based technologies, more and more colleges, universities, and businesses have embraced both open source and proprietary LMS tools. A growing trend in e-learning is the use of “hybrid” or “blended” or “multimodal” instructional approaches that replace or supplement partial in-class instruction with technologically enabled teaching and learning, which in many cases utilizes many tools bundled in the LMS.

Along the same lines many students engaged in e-learning may not be geographically distanced from the institution. For example, learners may be traditional learners living on campus or nearby yet taking course partially or fully online. This is often linked to the need for flexibility in personal (family) responsibilities and work schedules. Taking advantage of e-learning adds an extra layer of flexibility. In fact some people see distance learning as not being synonymous with e-learning, argue the point that distance learning is a generic term that presently happens to use the Internet as a vehicle. Thus, the position presented is that while distance education and e-learning do overlap, they are not identical but complementary.

E-learning is growing rapidly and is often associated with the Internet. There are however other modes of learning that are growing at a considerable rate too. Mobile learning (m-learning) for instance, is a rapidly growing innovation that has the advantage of allowing learners to be “on the move while learning. In other words, multi-tasking, for example jogging or listening to recorded lectures while driving to work. Therefore, m-learning is an extension of e-learning, which uses mobile (cell) phones, Personal digital assistants (PDA), and MP3 players (with iPods and podcasting being the mostly widely used). In places where bandwidth is limited m-learning is growing at a rapid rate.

As the technology gets more affordable and readily available, educational options will continue to expand. For those looking for flexibility due to family and work commitments, e-learning and m-learning may be an option to consider. For organizations and institutions looking to train employees without having to trade-off on productivity, time, cost, or hiring a consultant, this is also an option to consider.

Crash Course: Aviation Careers and Training

Interested in airplanes and flight? Mechanics and electronics? Aviation and aeronautical careers are increasing in demand as the population rises, the economy strengthens and people become more comfortable resuming air travel. Find out about the types of careers available and the training and experience required to pursue them.

Careers in the aviation and aeronautical field include pilots, flight engineers, aircraft mechanics, and avionics technicians. The following is a quick description of what each of these jobs entails.

o Aircraft mechanics (airframe mechanics, power plant mechanics, and avionics technicians) Airframe mechanics work on everything except instruments, power plants, and propellers. Powerplant mechanics do some work on propellers as well as work on engines. Workers can become certified in both airframe and powerplant mechanics (A&P) and work on all parts of plane excluding instruments.

o Avionics technicians maintain radio, navigation, and radar instruments and components. They may be required to acquire additional licensing by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

o Flight engineers often are the third member of the cockpit crew. They monitor instruments, make repairs, and assist the first officer and captain in flight. Flight engineers are required to have pilot’s licenses, flying experience, and must pass an exam given by the FAA. They may even become pilots with the right training, experience and desire.

o The First officer is also known as the co-pilot. The first officer monitors instruments during take-off and landing while the captain focuses on the runway and controls. During the flight the first officer and the captain alternate flying the plane.

o The Captain is the pilot in charge of the aircraft. He or she is assisted by the first officer and flight engineer. They are responsible for filing flight plans and making adjustments as necessary. It is possible to begin as a flight engineer and progress to the position of captain after serving a certain number of years and hours in each subordinate position.

Career advancement is possible at all levels; many technicians and mechanics can advance to supervisory, executive and FAA inspector positions. Aircraft inspector’s authorization provides the best opportunities.

In order to qualify for such positions as commercial and airline pilots, you must have a specific number of flight hours in many different conditions as well as an instrument rating issued by the FAA after the fulfillment of requirements including flight time and a written exam. Military training is often valuable and common for those who become commercial and airline pilots. (I can remember being told I’d know where my pilot trained by the smoothness of the landing. A bumpy landing signified one branch of the armed forces, while a virtually bump free landing was indicative of another branch.)

Although some aircraft mechanics and avionics technicians get on the job training, most attend a technical school certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Military experience can be quite an asset; however formal school training is still required, though you may receive credit for what you’ve learned in the service. Employers highly desire those with military work experience and training.

Keen math skills and physical agility are necessary for many aeronautical careers. Aviation careers also demand you not be afraid of heights. Workers are often on aircraft wings and in fact on top of the airplane’s fuselage for maintenance, inspection and repair–and of course pilots and flight engineers are in the sky much of the time. Mechanics and technicians often lift heavy equipment and parts, stand on ladders and must deal with the noise and vibration of engines.

So if your head is in the clouds why not keep it there? Make your dreams real with training to become an aircraft mechanic, aviation technician, flight engineer or pilot.